Wake Up Daddy….

I was going back and rewatching a few scenes from Ep 2., looking into some more clues about Audrey (my current obsession) and her possible involvement in the cult.  This is the episode that has both the scene with the girls at the lake, and the Barbie scene, both of which might tie into the idea of Audrey having been involved somehow in the cult.

And then I found this scene.  Everything here is a Voice Over from Marty

Marty:  Voice Over:  You’re looking for narrative,

Marty in bed

…and build a story day after day…
Martyinbed6….parcel evidence….

Martyinbed5

Audrey:  Wake up daddy…

Martyinbed4

Marty Voice Over: interrogate witnesses…
Martyinbed3

…You’re looking for narrative
martyinbed2

It gave me chills.  For me, the fact that this scene is in the same episode as the Barbie scene and the scene at the lake with the Father-in-law is very significant.  Little Audrey telling her daddy to Wake Up.  To see what is Right Under His Nose.

I’d also like to correct something I’ve been including in my ‘evidence’ that Audrey is involved somehow.  I had thought at the lake, it was Audrey who said “no” when Maise tells her to ask Grandpa for help baiting their fishing hook.  It is Audrey who says Ask Grandpa, and Maise who says know, and then immediately asks grandpa.  So, on that front, I don’t think that exchange adds anything, so I take it back.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Wake Up Daddy….

  1. Hey guy… Girl here. Something else about this scene… if you add in all the other frames with dialog… and considering the Nic P said in a recent interview: “You know, in the very first draft of episode two, Dora, in her diary, actually talks about ‘The Cypress King and his Stone Court.’ In writing, I noticed that Southern Gothic took you smoothly into the “Weird Tale,” whose visions of cosmic horror took you into noir and pulp. The King In Yellow is in there because it’s a story about a story, one that drives people to madness. Everything in True Detective is composed of questionable narratives, inner and outer, from Cohle’s view that identity is just a story we tell ourselves, to the stories about manhood that Hart tells about himself, to the not always truthful story they tell the detectives investigating them. So it made sense – to me, at least — to allude to an external narrative that that is supposed to create insanity, or as I prefer, deranged enlightenment. When I did that, a kind of secondary language began to form in the scripts, where the notion of cosmic horror became a very real part of the environment, at least for those who know Chambers’ work.”
    Where was I… oh yeah… that scene. What Rust and Marty are talking about in the voiceover sounds like what it might have been like for NicP to write this story. Rust: “Days of nothing… Days like lost dogs… (and then Marty comes in) Goes on like that… you know the job… You’re looking for narrative… Interrogate witnesses… Parcel evidence… Establish a timeline… Build a story… day after day.”
    This is what I’ve loved about this show… the questionability of it all. NP explains it here: “Everything in True Detective is composed of questionable narratives, inner and outer, from Cohle’s view that identity is just a story we tell ourselves, to the stories about manhood that Hart tells about himself, to the not always truthful story they tell the detectives investigating them. So it made sense – to me, at least — to allude to an external narrative that that is supposed to create insanity, or as I prefer, deranged enlightenment. When I did that, a kind of secondary language began to form in the scripts, where the notion of cosmic horror became a very real part of the environment, at least for those who know Chambers’ work.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s